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2016-2017 Course Descriptions

April 02, 2015

RANDOLPH JR/SR HIGH SCHOOL

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

LAST REVISED: Spring 2015

 

Junior High Courses:

 

7th Grade

 

Agriculture –Grade 7 (Semester Long)

Exploration into Ag and IT is a course designed to give 7th grade students a solid introduction into the Agricultural Industry.  Students will develop an understanding of the many different aspects of agriculture as well as an appreciation for the importance agriculture has on our daily lives. Topics related to Natural Resources, Wildlife, and the Agricultural industry as a whole will be covered and basic knowledge which sets a foundation for future agricultural classes will be gained.

 

Art – Grade 7

Students will have the opportunity to explore a variety of mediums in both 2 and 3-Deminsions. Students will work on foundational drawing and painting techniques. A variety of other mediums will also be explored to give the students a better understanding of the specialized areas of focus in the high school art courses.

 

Band – Grade 7

Participation in band includes pep band and concert band. Pep band will perform at the athletic events as listed on the schedule. Extra pep band performances may include district finals games and state championship games. All 7-12 band members, unless part of the athletic event, are required to play pep band.

 

Concert band is devoted to learning the basic elements of music and repertoire through voice. The band performs accordingly to the dates posted. Attire: red polo shirt, black pants, and shoes, dress clothes (no jeans, tennis shoes, or shorts acceptable), theme related or costume attire.

 

Choir – Grade 7

The concert choir is devoted to learning the basic elements of music and repertoire through voice. The choir will perform accordingly to the dates posted.

Attire for performances: choir robe, dress clothes (no jeans, tennis shoes, shorts, flip flops, casual wear), theme related or costume attire.

 

English – Grade 7

The focus of first semester of 7th grade English is primarily on grammar. We spend a fair amount of time on the parts of speech.  Vocabulary is also important and there is a vocabulary quiz every week which continues until the end of the year.  Also we read the novel The Wolfling.

The second semester begins with figurative language and how to identify the many types. Also we read The Outsiders.  We do an extensive unit on Mythology. The last quarter the students will be dedicated to writing skills.

 

FCS – Grade 7 (Semester Long)

This is a required course that focuses on the areas of personal hygiene and grooming, self-esteem, study skills, and conflict resolution. Basic kitchen safety and sanitation processes will also be covered. Through this course students will gain a better understanding of themselves and how to deal with personal conflicts.

 

History – Grade 7

Seventh grade history is the study of American History to 1877.  Students will use skills of historical and geographical analysis to explore the early history of the United States and understand ideas and events that strengthened the union.   Students will continue to learn fundamental concepts in civics, economics, and geography as they study United States history in chronological sequence and learn about change and continuity in our history.  The students will also study documents and speeches that laid the foundation of American ideals and institutions and will examine the everyday life of people at different times in the country’s history with primary and secondary sources.

 

Humanities – Grade 7

Students learn about life and people through musical, historical, and cultural perspectives. Students will study a combination of music and visual art concepts emphasizing the similarities and differences between the two disciplines. Students will focus on a wide range of materials and processes stressing quality and self expression.

 

Keyboarding - Grade 7 (Semester Long)

Keyboarding introduces the touch method of operating a computer.  Students will identify and operate computer keyboard parts.  They will use proper keyboarding techniques for letters, numbers, and symbols.  They will learn to compose key words, sentences, and paragraphs using appropriate capitalization and punctuation.  They will create and format a business letter properly.  They will create and format a memo properly.  They will learn to proofread and document and to correct documents using proper proofreading techniques.  The students will also work with the Internet on research and creating of reports which will be presented in front of class.

 

Life Science – Grade 7

Life Science is designed to introduce 7th grades into the study of life in general; cells, tissues, organs, and systems of various living things on Earth.  Specifically the class learns about early life on Earth, cell biology including a working knowledge of microscopes and how to prepare slides for microscopic study, taxonomy-the study of organization of living things, viruses and bacteria, fungus, plants and animals. It is designed as a lead in to high school biology.

 

Math – Grade 7

This course is the basic math requirement for 7th grade.  The course builds on math skills acquired in earlier grades and expands on those skills.  Major topics include general arithmetic, metric and US measurements, ratios and proportions, probability, and use of fractions and decimals.  In addition basics of geometry are covered including finding the perimeter and area of geometric figures and also determination of angles and side lengths.

 

Spanish – Grade 7 (Semester Long)

Spanish in 7th grade is a semester class which deals primarily with vocabulary.  The students learn common vocabulary and also a few verbs so they will be able to form sentences.  At the end of the semester, the students can ask and answer basic sentences. 

 

8th Grade

 

Agriculture – Grade 7 (Semester Long)

Intro to Ag is open to students who are interested in agriculture and leadership and is required for admittance into all upper level agricultural courses. The course of study includes information on FFA basics, Public Speaking, Ag Careers, and Record Keeping. In addition, students will also receive introductory instruction into the Industrial Technology program by developing skills in handling hand tools, wood materials, planning procedures and safe work habits in the school laboratory

 

Upon completion, students will have a knowledge base which will help them excel in any and all future agricultural classes, as well as give them a quality understanding of agriculture in general.  Topics include FFA history, parliamentary procedure, record keeping, public speaking, career preparation, hand tools, wood materials, and safe work habits.

 

Art – Grade 8

Students will have the opportunity to explore a variety of mediums in both 2 and 3-Deminsions. Students will work on foundational drawing and painting techniques. A variety of other mediums will also be explored to give the students a better understanding of the specialized areas of focus in the high school art courses.

 

Band – Grade 8

Participation in band includes pep band and concert band. Pep band will perform at the athletic events as listed on the schedule. Extra pep band performances may include district finals games and state championship games. All 7-12 band members, unless part of the athletic event, are required to play pep band.

 

Concert band is devoted to learning the basic elements of music and repertoire through voice. The band performs accordingly to the dates posted. Attire: red polo shirt, black pants, and shoes, dress clothes (no jeans, tennis shoes, or shorts acceptable), theme related or costume attire.

 

Choir – Grade 8

The concert choir is devoted to learning the basic elements of music and repertoire through voice. The choir will perform accordingly to the dates posted.

Attire for performances: choir robe, dress clothes (no jeans, tennis shoes, shorts, flip flops, casual wear), theme related or costume attire.

 

Civics and Economics – Grade 8

Junior High Civics and Economics starts with a semester of civic learning. The students evaluate historic perspectives of civic engagement, learn specifically about our federal system in the United States, and participate in civic learning through mock and real-life activities. They will better understand American government and laws, community involvement, and problems we encounter every day. The second semester the class turns to economics and starts with learning the basic principles and terminology. Then the class participates in slightly more advanced economic principles and engages in hands-on economic activities.  The class practices the principles of economics by running their own business.

 

English – Grade 8

The first semester of 8th grade English is dedicated to grammar as it is in grade seven.  The students will also have weekly vocabulary words and quizzes.  We read the book Flowers for Algernon.  Also we do a unit on the different genres of literature. 

The second semester begins with writing and learning to us imagery in descriptive writing.

We read the book Hiroshima also.  We also discuss the different types of figurative language so they will be able to identify them on their exams.  The end of the year we will return to grammar.

 

FCS – Grade 8

This is a required course that focuses on the areas of leadership, personal growth and development, as well as kitchen fundamentals such as reading a recipe, measurement and conversions, and basic cookery skills. Clothing selection and laundry will also be covered during this course.

 

Humanities – Grade 8

Students learn about life and people through musical, historical, and cultural perspectives. Students will study a combination of music and visual art concepts emphasizing the similarities and differences between the two disciplines. Students will focus on a wide range of materials and processes stressing quality and self expression.

 

Keyboarding – Grade 8

Keyboarding for 8th grade will improve the touch method of operating a computer. Students will identify and operate computer keyboard parts.  They will use proper keyboarding techniques for letters, numbers, and symbols.  They will learn to compose key words, sentences, and paragraphs using appropriate capitalization and punctuation.  They will create and format a business letter properly.  They will create and format a memo properly.  They will learn to proofread and document and to correct documents using proper proofreading techniques. The students will also work with the Internet on research and creating of reports.  The 8th grade class will also be introduced to 10-key and will work with multimedia for presentations.

 

Math – Grade 8

The Saxon Math Course 3 prepares students for the more rigorous math courses they will be required to take in high school. Algebraic thinking is a major focus, and is embedded and distributed throughout. Students build a solid foundation and confidence in algebra concepts as the course integrates and distributes traditional units, giving students time to learn and practice skills throughout the year, master content, and develop algebraic thinking.

 

Science – Grade 8

Earth Science is the basic science requirement for 8th grade.  The course covers four main units.  The first is the history of the earth and the use of map skills.  The next unit is about the structure and processes of the earth including the rocks and minerals that make up the earth and also volcanism and earthquakes.  The theory of plate tectonics is also covered in detail.  Third is meteorology and climatology.  The basics of weather systems and severe weather are covered along with information on various climate zones.  Astronomy makes up the fourth part of the course.  We will study the history of space exploration along with the earth’s place in the universe. 

 

Spanish – Grade 8 (Semester Long)

Spanish in 8th grade is also a semester class. We review what was previously taught and build on those skills.  The students begin to learn how to conjugate verbs which is important in Spanish I

At the end of the semester the students have a good foundation of forming sentences and are ready to take Spanish I if they so please. 

 

 

High School Credit Courses: (Grades 9-12)

 

Graduation Requirements:

To graduate, a student must complete four years or eight semesters of attendance, take a minimum of seven courses a semester, receive at least 270 total hours, and successfully complete the following minimum course credit hours:

 

MATH – 36 credit hours

SCIENCE – 36 credit hours

(Includes Physical Science and Biology)

SOCIAL SCIENCE – 42 credit hours

(Includes American History and American Government)

ENGLISH – 48 credit hours

HEALTH AND/OR PHYSICAL EDUCATION – 10 credit hours

 

High School Credit Course Descriptions:

 

2D Design

5 credits per semester (elective)

This art course is an introduction to the basic principles and elements of two-dimensional design. Through direct experience with the art making process, this course will help students solve visual problems and improve their ability to discuss artwork. This class will introduce students to various artistic media, processes, artists, and art criticism. Some of the mediums explored are charcoal, colored pencil, printmaking, batik, computer art, metal tooling, scratchboard, collage, etc. The importance of presentation and craftsmanship is emphasized. Students are encouraged to develop their own design vocabulary and repertoire of practical techniques. In addition to introducing formal design strategies, the course emphasizes exploring the historical and cultural context in which works of art are produced.

 

Accounting

5 credits per semester (elective)

The study of Accounting will give students a thorough background in the basic accounting procedures used to operate a proprietorship, partnership, or corporation.  Accounting study will also serve as a sound background for employment in office jobs, as well as understanding financial records for personal use. Course content includes: the accounting cycle with a combination journal, special journals, general ledger, and subsidiary ledgers; payroll records, including taxes and reports; accounting for sales tax, bad depts., depreciation, accrued revenue and expenses, inventory, notes and interest; a worksheet and financial statements for a service and merchandising business; accounting software.

 

Advanced Accounting

5 credits per semester (elective)

Advanced accounting expands on topics learned in Accounting, as well as adding new topics dealing with management accounting, cost accounting, and financial analysis.  The Study of Advanced Accounting is excellent preparation for college business and accounting courses, and may help qualify students for jobs at higher levels in business than one year of study would allow. Course content includes: departmentalized accounting, accounting control systems, general accounting adjustments, corporate accounting, managerial accounting, cost accounting, and accounting software.

 

Accounting III

5 credits per semester (elective)

Accounting III expands on topics learned in Advanced Accounting, as well as adding new topics dealing with Budgetary issues, Management decisions using several forms of analysis, Cost accounting, Accounting for Manufacturing businesses, Accounting for Partnerships and Non-Profit Organizations.  The Study of Advanced Accounting is excellent preparation for college business and accounting courses. Accounting III may help qualify students for jobs at higher levels in business organizations than two years of accounting study would allow. Course content includes: budgetary planning and control, management decisions using different forms of analysis, financial statement analysis, cash flow statements, cost accounting, accounting for a manufacturing business, partnerships, and not-for-profit organizations.

 

AgriScience – Ag 1

5 credits (elective – first semester only)

AgriScience is an introductory course for 9th grade or introductory students which feeds off of the foundations learned in Junior High.  This class is intended to develop a student’s understanding behind the scientific principles of agriculture.  Students will cover a variety of topics ranging from plant growth to livestock management and food science to natural resources.  Laboratory activities will supplement the classroom to help students apply the material learned in class.  Topics include agriscience in the information age, natural resources, pest management, plant science, crop science, ornamental plants, animal science, food science and technology, and communications and management.

 

Algebra I

6 credits per semester (Math)

The purpose of the Algebra 1 curriculum is to increase student awareness of the importance of mathematics in the modern world. The students will become more confident in their ability to work with mathematical concepts and relationships. They will learn how to think systematically and use the precise logic required for mathematical problem solving. This course builds on the student's understanding of basic mathematics in the study of algebraic skills and problem solving. Students will learn to express real-life problems in algebraic sentences in order to find solutions.

 

Algebra II

6 credits per semester (Math)

This course provides a comprehensive teaching of the fundamental aspects of problem solving. It offers a substantial review of all topics in Algebra 1 and then moves on to cover these topics at an advanced level. Major topics include the solving and graphing of linear and quadratic equations, factoring, a variety of types of word problems, solving quadratic equations by completing the square, solving simultaneous equations with fractions and decimals, complex roots of quadratic equations, solving systems of nonlinear equations, graphing and solving a system of inequalities, exponential equations, probability and statistics topics.

 

American Government

6 credits per semester (Social Science)

Government class helps the student understand the development of our system in the U.S. and compares it to the systems used thought the world. Students become well versed in understanding Constitution and how the principles found in the document work in the country today. Also, the students are walked thought the different levels of government in our federal system and are taught how each affects their lives. Students also engage in civic learning and participate in service learning activities. The students also work on research skills, completing quarterly research papers including one based on student-generated data.

 

American History I/Nebraska History

6 credits per semester (Social Science)

The sophomore class covers material for American History first semester. The class covers the information from prehistoric through Civil War eras. American History I also covers geographic and economic principles that coincide with the material in class. The sophomore class then turns to Nebraska History during the second semester, learning specifically about the state through prehistoric to current eras. The class chronologically walks through history while learning about the people, geography, government and economy of the state.

 

American History II

6 credits per semester (Social Science)

American History is a class to help junior students understand our nation’s history to a greater degree. It uses higher level and critical thinking skills and ties events of history to today’s world. Students will engage in lessons that not only develop historical understanding, but will continue to advance their knowledge of geographical, economical, political, and social features at work in the nation and throughout the world. Students in 10th and 11th grade will work chronologically though historical events learning how the events of the past shaped the nation and people we are today.


Anatomy & Physiology

6 credits per semester (Science)

Anatomy & Physiology (A&P) is offered to both 11th and 12th graders and biology 1 is a prerequisite.  It is the study of the form and function of the human body.  It is intended as a college prep class and requires a great deal of memorization of body parts and their functions.  Microscopic work is an essential part of A&P.  

 

Animal Science

5 credits per semester (elective)

Animal Science is designed to offer 11th or 12th grade students a background in several different aspects of Livestock Production.  Throughout the semester students will be instructed in management skills for beef cattle, swine, sheep, horses, poultry, dairy cattle, and companion animals as well as learn about different livestock systems, animal nutrition, livestock careers, and biotechnology. Topics include livestock careers, economic impacts, breeds of livestock, animal anatomy, animal management, nutrition, record keeping, livestock products, and biotechnology.

 

Band

2.5 credits per semester (elective)

Participation in band includes pep band and concert band. Pep band will perform at the athletic events as listed on the schedule. Extra pep band performances may include district finals games and state championship games. All 7-12 band members, unless part of the athletic event, are required to play pep band.

 

Concert band is devoted to learning the basic elements of music and repertoire through voice. The band performs accordingly to the dates posted. Attire: red polo shirt, black pants, and shoes, dress clothes (no jeans, tennis shoes, or shorts acceptable), theme related or costume attire.

 

Biology

6 credits per semester (Science - 12 credits required for graduation)

Biology 1 is typically taken by 10th graders and is an extension of 7th grade life science. A knowledge of microscopes and slide preparation is used.  Cells, tissues, organs and systems of living organisms are studied.  A great deal is done in the study of Genetics, both Mendelian and human.  There is also a study of human evolution included in the course content.


Biology 2

6 credits per semester (Science)

Biology 2 is typically offered to 11th and 12th graders.  Some 10th graders have taken the class if nothing else works in the schedule.  The first semester is a study of Ecology-interactions of organisms and the environment-species, populations.  The second semester is a study of Darwin and general Evolution theory.  The class also is in charge of plastic recycling during the year as part of learning how to care for the environment.  

 

Business Communications/HTML

5 credits per semester (elective)

Business communications introduces the student to web design.  The course teaches to students to create a web page using Microsoft Expression.  They also learn to upload and download using an ftp program.  The class will create multiple presentations using different types of media.  They will work with music, video, pictures, animation program, and an interactive board.  Students will have to create and act in multiple productions using these techniques.

 

Business Law

5 credits per semester (elective)

Business Law is a course that exposes students to the constitution and the procedure in which criminal and civil courts are conducted.  The course emphasizes teaching on minor law, family law, consumer law, and contracts.  The students will work through multiple case studies and be responsible for creating their own scenarios that fit with the law.  Current events are also studied with research and presentations.

 

Business Procedures

5 credits per semester (elective)

Business Procedures exposes the student to organizing, planning and processing information in a business.  The course integrates the use of word processing, database, spreadsheet, desktop publishing, power point, and telecommunications.  The class will explore careers, do business simulations, and learn about different salaries, locations, and demographics.  The class takes the students through the various office projects from basic filing, hiring employees, handling paychecks, communication skills, and working through grievance procedures.

 

CardinalCAM Industries

5 credits per semester (elective)

CardinalCAM is a metallurgy business ran entirely by the 11th and/or 12th grade students in the class.  Students will gain knowledge in a variety of topics related to Entrepreneurship including sales, marketing, graphic design, billing/invoicing, project estimates, record keeping, profit and loss determinations, etc.  Students will be required to speak directly with customers, develop design ideas, and follow through with the manufacturing of steel signage, and machine parts, as well as create new products which we can sell on the open market. 

Potential students should have an interest in entrepreneurial business, be proficient in computer usage, be creative, hardworking, and self motivated.

 

Career Readiness/Internship I

5 credits per semester (elective)

In this junior or senior level class, students learn and apply the career and college planning process using the Nebraska Career Education Model and related resources. Students will identify personal interests, skills, values, and then apply this knowledge to both academic and career decision making. Students will demonstrate progress/proficiency in Nebraska Career Readiness Standards of Practice, which are current expectations in today’s workplace considerations. Students will also gain job shadowing experience within an area of student interest. Second semester senior would have the opportunity to move onto Internship II.

 

Chemistry

6 credits per semester (Science)

This course is an elective course that would count for science credit for juniors or seniors.

Chemistry is the study of matter and its interactions.  Metric measurement is introduced and used throughout the course.  The course consists of atomic structure, the periodic table, reactions and bonding, states of matter, energy changes, gas laws, solutions, acid and base chemistry, organic and biological compounds and nuclear reactions.  Students will use math regularly and will complete lab activities to enforce course learning.  This course is designed to be at college prep level, but is not limited to students planning to attend college.

 

Child Development

5 credits per semester (elective)

This course studies human growth and development from conception through the adolescent years. Emphasis will be placed on parenting responsibilities that promote and enhance a child’s growth and development. Students will understand the interrelationship of physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development.

 

Choir

2.5 credits per semester (elective)

The concert choir is devoted to learning the basic elements of music and repertoire through voice. The choir will perform accordingly to the dates posted.

Attire for performances: choir robe, dress clothes (no jeans, tennis shoes, shorts, flip flops, casual wear), theme related or costume attire.

 

College Credit/Dual Credit Course

0-5/6 credits per semester

It is recommended that this is an option for juniors and seniors who have obtained an average GPA of 90%. Courses are typically taken through Northeast Community College; however, other colleges may be looked into if looking for a particular course. Some courses may be taken for both high school credit and college credit. These classes are called dual credit courses. Classes may also be taken for only college credit. If taken for only college credit, the class will have no effect on the student’s high school GPA.

 

Computer Operations

5 credits per semester (elective)

Computer Operations allows students to develop skills in composing and formatting of various documents.  Students will learn to use all hardware and software properly.  They will develop keyboarding techniques for all letters, numbers, and symbols.  Office software is learned such as word processing, database, spreadsheet, power point, publisher, and office wizards.   A wide variety of research projects are used along with correct formatting practices to create presentations for the class.

 

CP English 12

6 credits per semester (English)

In order to prepare for college, the students will study eight units of Classics in World Literature.  This includes a variety of literature from 3000 BC to 1990.  Each unit has specific activities including quizzes, tests, vocabulary, and writing.  The students will study advanced vocabulary throughout the year with quizzes and reviews.  Two units of poetry will be completed and poems will be sent to Creative Communications for an opportunity to be published.  Along with world literature, the following novels will be studied:  In Cold Blood, The Iliad, Night, And Then There Were None, and the play “The Tempest”.  During the first quarter and the third quarter, the students will work on college scholarships and applications.  Journaling will be required to enhance note taking and listening skills.  An extensive, personal portfolio project will be completed during the second semester.  The students will complete a research project using MLA citation.

 

Culinary Skills

5 credits per semester (elective)

Students will study foods by classifications and may include topics such as appetizers, pies, cakes, meat, poultry, foreign cookery, yeast breads, fruits and vegetables. Students will also become proficient in following OSHA safety procedures as well as restaurant quality food safety handling. Class activities may include small projects and food laboratory experience.

 

Drawing & Painting

5 credits per semester (elective)

Students will focus on building a strong foundation of drawing skills during the first semester. Techniques such as grid drawing, shading, blending, and drawing from life will be used in a variety of drawings. Students will explore dry mediums such as charcoal, graphite, pastel, and colored pencil. A strong emphasis will be placed on good composition and choosing strong subjects.

 

During the second semester students will explore a variety of painting techniques through the use of acrylic and watercolor paints. Students will continue to develop an understanding of color theory and composition. Students will paint on traditional canvas and papers as well as nontraditional objects. Through the exploration of public murals throughout history, students will gain an understanding of how artists have helped shape our views of past civilizations.

 

E-Commerce

5 credits per semester (elective)

E-Commerce is the basis of marketing and selling products or services on the Internet.  The students are learning what hardware, software, and personnel skills are necessary to set up such a business.  They are also creating products and companies, then directing them towards the consumer with web sites.  The class is also learning different ways to reach a consumer besides traditional methods.

 

Economics

6 credits per semester (Social Science)

This course will concentrate on basic economic concepts.  The class will enable you to understand your role in our economy as well as roles of the consumer and the producer.  Economics will also look at the role of governments in a country’s economy and students will learn to differentiate different types of economic standards will be covered and students will be able to test on those areas covered in the 11th grade social science standards.

 

Fashion/Housing

5 credits per semester (elective)

This course is divided into two sections consisting of fashion and interior design. The first part of the course introduces students to concepts related to fabrics, color, line and design, fashion history, personal wardrobe planning, clothing care, and buying clothing. During this time students will also construct individual clothing projects. The second part of the course students will create functional and pleasing living environments based on sound financial decisions and design principles. Topics will include: housing needs through the life cycle, architectural and furniture styles, principles and elements of design, swatch boards, floor plans, and furniture arrangement.

 

Foods & Nutrition

5 credits per semester (elective)

This course is designed to provide students with basic food and nutrition knowledge.

Emphasis is placed on safety and sanitation, the Dietary Guidelines, nutrients, and the new MyPlate guidelines. This nutritional information will be taught through class activities and discussions, journals, posters, skits, presentations, and food laboratory experiences. Students will learn various food preparation skills, equipment use, recipe reading, and how to be a wise consumer.

 

English 9

6 credits per semester (English)

Throughout the year, English 9 will work on several grammar chapters and study a variety of vocabulary words.  Vocabulary reviews are given each quarter and grammar tests will follow appropriate chapters.  Grammar tests will follow appropriate chapters, vocabulary quizzes will be given after each set of words, and a vocabulary review will be given each quarter.  The students will complete two poetry units and send poetry to Creative Communications for a chance to be published.  Students will read the following novels and short stories:  The Lightning Thief, Romeo & Juliet, To Kill a Mockingbird, Johnny Tremain, and an assortment of fairy tales.  Journaling is required each quarter to work on listening skills and note taking skills.

 

English 10

6 credits per semester (English)

The English 10 students will complete several chapters of grammar, including tests as chapters are finished.  Students will focus on the 6 + 1 Writing Traits and complete six stories, four in the first semester and two in the second semester.  Along with writing skills, the students will practice note taking and listen skills via journaling.  Three of these stories will be read in class.  Along with writing stories, the students will complete two units of poetry and send chosen poetry to Creative Communications for an opportunity to be published.  Vocabulary will be given throughout the year with quizzes at the end of each chapter and a unit review at the end of each unit.  The students will read and study the following novels:  Of Mice and Men, Lord of the Flies, A Night to Remember, and The Hobbit

 

English 11

6 credits per semester (English)

The students will study a variety of grammar throughout the year with testing at completion of each chapter.  During the first semester, John Baylor sections will be offered to prepare for the ACT tests.  The students will complete two units of poetry and send one poem to Creative Communications for a chance to be published.  At the end of the first semester and beginning of the second semester, students will practice writing skills in preparation for the standardized testing.  Vocabulary will be studied throughout the year with quizzes and reviews.  The students will use note taking and listening skills while journaling.  The following novels will be studied:  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, Dracula, and Black Boy

 

English 12

6 credits per semester (English)

Most of the school year, the students will focus on a variety of literature.  Some of the novels include:  In Cold Blood, Rosa Parks:  My Story, Night, And Then There Were None, The Book Thief, and The Witch of Blackbird Pond.  Other readings include fairy tales, short stories, and poetry.  The students will study two units of poetry and send poems to Creative Communications for a chance to be published.  Vocabulary will be studied throughout the year, including quizzes and reviews.  The students will practice listening skills and note taking skills by journaling each quarter.  A refresher unit of grammar usage and rules will be studied.  The students will create a short research paper on a given topic.  The second semester will include an extensive portfolio project about themselves.

 

General Business

5 credits per semester (elective)

The basic objectives of General Business are to introduce students to the world of business and help prepare them to compete in today’s economic world. Course content includes: economic decisions and systems, economic activity, business in the global economy, social responsibility of business, business organization, entrepreneurship and small business management, human resources, culture and diversity, career exploration and planning, marketing, technology in business, financial planning and management, production and business operations, risk management, consumers in the global economy, money management and financial planning, banking and financial services, consumer credit, savings and investment strategies, and insurance.

 

Geometry

6 credits per semester (Math)

The study of Geometry includes math vocabulary, organization of proofs, points, lines, planes and angles, parallel lines and planes, transformations and congruence, congruent triangles, similar polygons, right triangles, circles, areas of plane and solid figures, volumes and surface areas of solids, using formulas in solving problems, visualizing geometric situations, and using geometric ideas in real situations. The objective of this course is to provide the student with the requisite foundation for the study of advanced algebra and trigonometry.

 

Health

5 credits per semester (elective)

Health is a course designed for high school students to address personal, family, and societal health issues through an understanding of their own growth and development; an opportunity to develop the ability to understand and interpret health information; the knowledge and skills to understand and utilize reliable health care; a critical attitude toward health advertisements and safety aspects in their own daily activities. Some topics in this course will be: emotional and mental health, stress, physical fitness, nutrition and weight control, caring for the body, conception and birth, aging and death, drugs, alcohol, smoking tobacco use, STD’s/STI’s, peer pressure, and healthy relationships with friends and family.

 

Internship II

5 credits per semester (elective)

This 2nd semester senior level course allows students to get on the job experience in a field of interest to them. Students would be expected to meet the expectations of their job site supervisor as well as the expectations of their internship class. Students will apply the eleven Nebraska Career Readiness standards while learning on the job skills.

 

Intro to Algebra

6 credits per semester (Math)

This course prepares students for the yearlong Algebra course in high school.  The focus of this course is building the foundation necessary for success in the study of algebra.  Students will concentrate on the following concepts: integers, expressions, solving equations, number theory, rational numbers, ratios, proportions, percentages, equations and inequalities, graphing, geometry, measurement, and probability.

 

Journalism

5 credits per semester (elective)

Students will learn the different styles of news writing along with the rules and regulations.  They will research, interview, and write various types of articles for the school newsletter each week.  Current events will be discussed as the students watch the news in class each week.  Internet projects will be completed throughout the year.  The students will work on pages of the yearbook, including designs, layouts, captions, and photography.

 

Journalism II

This class will continue with lessons from Journalism I.  All students will write articles for the school newsletter every week as well as write articles for the Randolph Newsletter (as soon as it is established).  As second year students, they will take photos at least once every quarter for the yearbook.  Students will also keep the honor board updated and complete a composite for the commons.  If allowed, students will have news articles published in the Randolph Times and possibly the Norfolk Daily News

 

Life Skills/Adult Living

5 credits per semester (elective)

In this elective course students will explore the complexities and responsibilities associated with being an adult. Personal finances, interpersonal skills needed to live both independently and with a roommate, the responsibilities of parenthood, are just some of the issues that will be explored in this year long class.

 

Photography and Digital Media

5 credits per semester (elective)

This course focuses on understanding the basic operations and functions of a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera and the manipulation of its settings. Students will learn about photographic elements of art, design, composition, and lighting. Students learn image techniques and digital manipulation using editing software, teaching them how to archive, organize and optimize their photographs. Students will write and talk about aesthetic qualities in a photograph as they learn to critique their own and others work. Students will also learn how to create original works of art using digital media tools. Students will critically analyze the use of visual media as a means of communication in our society today. They will explore the history of photography and digital media and how it has shaped their worldview.

 

Physical Education

5 credits per semester (PE)

The Physical Education classes are coeducational.  Students will physical fitness as well as a sound body.  Unit activities will include Flag Football Tennis, Golf, Basketball, Bowling, Soccer, Softball and Weight Training.  Every student will have an opportunity to perceive and function within their individual limitation of the training situations.

 

Physical Science

6 credits per semester (Science)

This course is the freshman science requirement. Physical Science combines the basic concepts of chemistry and physics.  The chemistry section covers matter and atoms, elements and compounds, chemical and physical changes, and organic and biological compounds.  The physics section covers motion and energy, machines, light and sound waves, and optics.  Math is commonly used in this course.

 

Physics

6 credits per semester (Science)

This is an elective science course for seniors. Physics is the basis for all other sciences.  The emphasis of the class is on problem solving and the application of mathematics, including trigonometry.  The class will give the student the basis for success in college physics and science classes.  The course information includes motion and forces, gravity, energy, fluids and gas behavior, solid state physics, wave behavior including sound and light waves, and modern physics with a brief overview of relativity and quantum mechanics.  Chemistry is not a prerequisite, but previous completion is highly encouraged.  In addition, it is recommended that Algebra 1 and 2, and geometry have been previously completed.  Students are also encouraged to take a class in calculus or pre-calculus in the same year.

 

Plant/Soil Science and Welding

5 credits per semester (elective)

Plant & Soil Science/Welding is open to 10th grade students and above who are interested in agriculture and leadership. The course includes plant and soil science and welding technology.

 

Plant and Soil Science is offered during the first semester. It is a course that is designed to educate students on plant growth requirements and soil properties. Topics covered are agricultural careers, soil physical properties such as pH and parent material, soil conservation, soil maps, plant classifications, general plant growth and requirements, plant and weed ID, pests, plant diseases, etc. Skills assignments are completed by the students and students will compete in the Land Judging competition as part of the class.           

 

Welding is taught during the second semester.  Topics covered are the fundamentals and safety of the oxyacetylene welding, gas metal arc welding, and shielded metal arc welding. Skills assignments are completed by the students.

 

Pre-Calculus/ Trigonometry

6 credits per semester (Math)

This course will continue the mathematical development begun in Algebra 1 and Algebra 2. Students will begin with a review of the fundamental concepts of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry in order to progressively build towards comprehending more advanced concepts. Topics will include congruent figures, similarity, complex fractions, advanced word problems, exponential functions, and advanced trigonometric equations, trigonometric identities and their applications, graphing conic sections, and analytical geometry.

 

Psychology

6 credits per semester (Social Science)

This class will enable you to understand why psychology is defined as the scientific study of behavior.  Topics will include: principles of learning, types of personality, understanding human behavior, patterns of behavior, emotional and behavioral adjustments, group influences, and psychology and society.  In many cases the medium of film will be used.  The students will study concepts and then see a demonstration of these concepts in modern film.  Students will do research, write critiques, and do project presentations.

 

Psychology 2

Psychology is the systematic study of individual human behavior and experience. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the content, terminology, methodology, and application of the discipline. This survey course contains an introduction followed by four units based on the physiological, cognitive, behavioral, and affective domains of psychology. This elective course stresses the application of academic content to the student’s life.

 

Sculpture

5 credits per semester (elective)

This course explores art in 3-Demensional form. A variety of mediums will be explored such as textiles, ceramics, paper mache, wire sculpture, found objects etc. Students will participate in a wide range of experiences using both additive and subtractive techniques designed to build artistic and creative confidence. Students will also gain an understanding of various cultures throughout history as they examine how sculpture has helped shaped our views of past civilizations.

 

Spanish I

6 credits per semester (elective, but highly recommended for 4-year college admission)

The first semester of Spanish I focuses mainly on vocabulary and conjugating verbs in the present tense. Each chapter has a theme which helps the students to learn their vocabulary.  Grammar is also important. The second semester continues with vocabulary of course. The simple past tense is introduced and students learn to conjugate verbs using both tenses.  Grammar aspects include direct and indirect objects.

 

Spanish II

6 credits per semester (elective, but highly recommended for 4-year college admission)

The students will begin Spanish II reviewing what they had learned in Spanish I. After the review, the students begin to learn the imperfect tense which is another past tense. Vocabulary continues to be important and each chapter has many new words. The second semester the students learn more tenses- the imperfect progressive, the future, and the conditional.

 

Spanish III

6 credits per semester (elective)

In Spanish III the chapters are longer and with more vocabulary than the previous classes.

Each chapter has stories the students read and are tested on. Tenses continue to be important.  The subjunctive mood is introduced in the second semester which is very important mood in the Spanish language. By the end of the year, the students are able to conjugate verbs sufficiently in many tenses.  Also the students are able to ask and answer questions.

 

Spanish IV

6 credits per semester (elective)

Spanish IV begins with reading stories and answering questions.  Grammar is reviewed while reading the stories. Once a month the students are required to write about a picture which helps with vocabulary and grammar. The second semester we focus on vocabulary and grammar. The vocabulary in each chapter of the Spanish IV book is quite extensive.  Each test has a listening part in which the students are required to listen and answer questions in Spanish. At the end of the year, the students begin to read short stories of Spanish literature. The only new tense is the imperfect subjunctive and that is taught at the end of the year.

 

Speech

5 credits per semester (elective)

Students will work on public speaking throughout the year.  The first semester will be spent on studying different types of speeches.  This includes informative, persuasive, poetry, duet, oral interpretation, extemporaneous, and prose.  Other activities include radio and TV commercials, farewell speeches, congratulations speeches, interviews, and debate.  The students will create visual aides to accompany certain speeches.  During the second semester, the students will attend at least one speech competition and participate in the home performance.  They will experience public speaking as a participant and an observer.

 

Standards Math

6 credits per semester (Math)

This course is designed to get the juniors ready to take the NeSA Math Test in the spring. It reviews basic Algebra I and Geometry topics as well as probability and statistics. Major topics include slope, solving equations, writing and graphing linear and quadratic equations, solving linear systems, Pythagorean Theorem, factoring polynomials, and volume and surface are of three dimensional shapes.

 

Strength Training

5 credits per semester (PE)

The purpose of the strength training class is to teach boys and girls proper warm-up activities, including flexibility and agility, proper weight lifting techniques, and learning more about how to maximize results through varied workouts.

 

The strength training class will be highly structured and organized due to limited amount of time available for class.  Students will be expected to meet all guidelines or risk removal from the class.  Students will receive a designated amount of time to change into appropriate clothing before the class begins warm-up activities.  Once warm-ups are completed, weight training and/or plyometric activities will be tailored to students needs throughout the school year.

There will be a maximum enrollment 20 students. Students who participate in sports will be given a higher priority.

 

Woods I

5 credits (elective - second semester only)

Woods I is an introduction for 9th graders and introductory students into hand and power tool use and fine woodworking, and is required for admittance into all upper level IT courses.  Throughout the course of the semester, students will learn how to properly operate and maintain all the tools used in the laboratory, as well as the safety procedures that should be used not only when in the laboratory, but anytime these tools are used.  Students will also gain a basic knowledge of the techniques used in fine woodworking and cabinetry and gain an appreciation for both hard and soft woods.  As part of this course, students will design and construct a step stool using a variety of woodworking methods in preparation for advanced woodworking classes.

Topics include, wood taxonomy, laboratory safety, tool use, tool maintenance, project planning, and finishing.

 

Woods II, III, & IV

5 credits per semester (elective)

Woods II is an advanced fine working course.  Students must have taken Woods I as a prerequisite. In Woods II students will be exposed to specialty tools and techniques, and will complete more advanced woodworking projects.  Upon completion of this course, students should be able to operate hand and power tools in a way which maximizes efficiency and technique, construct complex projects, as well as be qualified to design, plan, and produce almost any fine wood project.

 

World History

6 credits per semester (Social Science)

World History is a ninth grade course. It is the study of causes and consequences of the major events in the history of the world.  It is also the story of the human community – how people lived on a daily basis, how they shared ideas, how they ruled and were ruled, and how they fought.  This course will also look at the physical aspects of geography and human geography in all areas of the world.  Stereotypes will also be discussed as well as how cultures and traditions change over time. 

 

 

 

 

 
 

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